Author Topic: EASA Aircraft  (Read 4162 times)

cheeky172

EASA Aircraft
« on: November 30, 2015, 12:24:49 pm »
I went to the Flyer live and sat through the presentation, understood most of it and registered for when stock arrives when I got home.
I will need to have my TT31 software updated, so asked my maintenance organisation to remove the transponder and have it ready to collect.
He is doubting whether this device is legal in and EASA aircraft.
He informs me all ADSB out has to be TSO'd via a permanentpanel mount certified GPS.
Can anyone confirm that it is ok to install in my 172 for me before I remove the TT31?

Thanks

Neil.
 

SteveHutt

Re: EASA Aircraft
« Reply #1 on: November 30, 2015, 01:15:20 pm »
Hi Neil,

Remember the NATS ADS-B Trial? You can read about it here: http://www.nats.aero/news/nats-enable-ads-b-transponder-functionality-ga-community/

and here: http://nats.aero/blog/2015/01/helping-general-aviation-stand-crowd/

and also this letter: http://www.nats.aero/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/LPAT-Trial-v.2-Generic.pdf

On the first web page above it says:
"To take part in the trial a minor aircraft modification must be approved by either the CAA or EASA, or other delegated authority like the Light Aircraft Association or British Microlight Aircraft Association. The CAA is helping to encourage the trial by waiving its minor modification fee for qualifying ‘annex II’ aircraft."

To my knowledge, no regulations were changed to enable the trial. I suggest you (or your maintenance organisation) approach the CAA about the Minor Mod. Expect to pay a Minor Mod fee as it says they are only waiving the fee for annex II a/c.

In the letter it asks for the name of the Aircraft Engineer that will perform the modification. Although the trial is now over, NATS advised the CAA Conspicuity Working Group that they will continue to support the Mod process for another 6 - 9 months. In the letter it also said that "Participants may be required to disconnect the GPS source at the end of the trial." To my knowledge, none of the participants has been requested to do so.

I hope that helps. I suggest you share the above links and letter with your maintenance organisation. Do please post an update of how you get on.

Regards,
Steve

Steve Hutt

cheeky172

Re: EASA Aircraft
« Reply #2 on: November 30, 2015, 04:12:58 pm »
Hi Steve,
Thanks for this I have copied my engineers, my TT31 is off back to Trig tomorrow for the upgrade in the software.
I will see if your post will convince  my maintenance guys who on the phone were very jittery.
cheers
Neil.

SteveHutt

Re: EASA Aircraft
« Reply #3 on: November 30, 2015, 04:34:21 pm »
Hi Neil,

As long as your Maintenance guys get an official CAA Minor Mod procedure to follow and they can see that the CAA are supportive then there ought not be anything to frighten them. I hope the CAA are supportive. All the participants in the NATS trial were LAA or BMAA aircraft as, once the LAA and BMAA MOD procedures were sorted out, it was easier as it was pretty much within the owners own control. No CofA aircraft took up the opportunity to use the Minor Mod for the uncertified GPS ADS-B for the trial so you may well be the very first. Let's hope the CAA remember and respond positively.

Good Luck,

Steve
Steve Hutt

The Westmorland Flyer

Re: EASA Aircraft
« Reply #4 on: December 04, 2015, 10:11:35 am »
It's understandable that the avionics engineers are jittery. It flies directly in the face of everything they know, namely that aircraft avionics MUST be certified and uncertified kit is the work of the devil, sure to fail and bring the aircraft crashing to the ground. I've met plenty that think like that and it's not surprising because all their training reinforces that view. When I was first looking at moving from owning a C of A aircraft into the Permit/LAA world I was assured by my then engineer that it would all end in tears.

It's not surprising, either, that there were no C of A aircraft in the trial. Even with the minor mod fee waived, it would be an expensive job (simple task, time consuming paperwork), with no certainty that another expensive job would not be needed to undo the mod afterwards. Add that to the engineers' reluctance to recognise the validity of uncertified kit and it just became too hard and difficult.

The situation should be different now, with the trial completed and the LAA allowing all its aircraft to continue using uncertified GPS into ADS-B out. It probably needs some sort of formal statement from the CAA that the same will apply to all C of A aircraft.
John
G-JONL, Sportcruiser, Carlisle